October 5, 2014

It’s been half a century since the Great Society, and historian Gary Donaldson takes a look at how Lyndon Johnson, working with President Eisenhower, accumulated the political clout to change America. Professor Karen Piper foresees a world that will be fighting wars about water, which, of course, is abundant – but severely maldistributed. And Bill Press interviews Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings about the Secret Service mess.

  • Oct. 5, 2014 Oct. 5, 2014 Gary Donaldson on the LBJ alliance with Eisenhower. Karen Piper on how corporations control the world’s water. And Bill Press interviews Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings.
  • Gary Donaldson Gary Donaldson Fifty years after the high point of Lyndon Johnson’s power, historian Gary Donaldson talks about how he had previously reached an accommodation with President Eisenhower to keep the country on a middle road of prosperity.
  • Karen Piper Karen Piper With the American Southwest facing water shortages, professor Karen Piper offers us a more global outlook on water distribution, which she says is largely a matter of corporate control.
  • Elijah Cummings Elijah Cummings Bill Press and his guest, Elijah Cummings, the Maryland Congressman and ranking Democrat on the House Oversight Committee.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower GOP boo-boo reveals secret corporate donors.

Right-click to download
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

October 20, 2013

The role of government in regulating food safety came up recently when the FDA and Agriculture Department were shut down. But food expert Robert Paarlberg says the biggest health danger lies in your own kitchen. Historian Richard Moe tells us that FDR never wanted to run for a third term, until World War II made him. He also says Obama can take a lesson from FDR by using executive power when Congress won’t cooperate. And Bill Press talks about the legacy of JFK with political scientist Larry Sabato.

  • Oct. 20, 2013 Oct. 20, 2013 Food expert Robert Paarlberg says the biggest danger from contaminated food comes from your own kitchen. Historian Richard Moe says Obama can take lessons from FDR. And Larry Sabato talks with Bill Press about the JFK legacy.
  • Robert Paarlberg Robert Paarlberg Professor Robert Paarlberg is an expert on American agriculture and food production. He says there is no evidence of risk from genetically modified organisms, BUT what’s most likely to make you sick is how you prepare food in your own kitchen!
  • Richard Moe Richard Moe Historian and author Richard Moe says FDR ran for a third term only because he couldn’t find another Democrat who would follow his policies and could win the election. He also says President Obama has something to learn from FDR’s second term blues.
  • Larry Sabato Larry Sabato Bill Press and his guest, political scientist Larry Sabato about the legacy of JFK.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Wall Street magicians make reform disappear.

Right-click to download
Full Show
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Robert Paarlberg
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Richard Moe
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Larry Sabato
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Jim Hightower
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

October 13, 2013

With the baseball playoffs in full swing, fans and viewers will hear “God Bless America” during every 7th inning stretch. A music scholar tells us how it has become such a powerful national song. With a new head of the Fed and the fear of national default in the air, progressive economist James K. Galbraith reviews the meaning of government shutdowns, budget sequesters and the debt ceiling. And Bill Press talks with Iowa Congressman Bruce Braley.

  • October 13, 2013 October 13, 2013 Music historian Sheryl Kaskowitz explains why we are singing “God Bless America” so much. Economist James K. Galbraith assesses the country’s economic mess. Bill Press interviews Congressman Bruce Braley.
  • Sheryl Kaskowitz Sheryl Kaskowitz Everyone knows the song “God Bless America.” It will be sung during every post-season baseball game. But it has a powerful and controversial history and, says author Sheryl Kaskowitz, communal singing of it can have “a coercive element.”
  • James K. Galbraith James K. Galbraith Economist James K. Galbraith offers his view on the way out of America’s politically-driven economic mess, with an emphasis on the environment, infrastructure repair and an aging population.
  • Bruce Braley Bruce Braley Bill Press and his guest, Congressman Bruce Braley of Iowa.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Monsanto buys a food prize.

Right-click to download
Full Show
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Sheryl Kaskowitz
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
James K. Galbraith
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Bruce Braley
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Jim Hightower
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

September 1, 2013

Labor Day 2013 finds much of the nation finally focused on income disparities and the plight of minimum wage workers. Our guests today speak directly to those issues. Long-time union leader Paul Booth says the fight progressives must make is not only about good wages, but good wedges — framing our concerns in terms of winning wedge issues. Economist John Schmitt takes us through the history of the minimum wage fight. And Bill Press talks with the University of Virginia’s Larry Sabato about that state’s race for governor.

  • September 1, 2013 September 1, 2013 Reflections on the plight of organized labor, with union leader Paul Booth and economist John Schmitt on how to fight the Republican assault on working people.
  • Paul Booth Paul Booth Labor Day commemorates the contributions of America’s working men and women, and a leader of the government workers union, Paul Booth, says that just being right on issues isn’t enough – you have to use language to win the message war.
  • John Schmitt John Schmitt Economist John Schmitt explains how the productivity of American workers has gone up since World War II, and how steeply wages have fallen in comparison. He answers the question of where in the world the McDonald’s worker does better.
  • Larry Sabato Larry Sabato Bill Press talks with the University of Virginia’s Larry Sabato about that state’s race for governor.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Where Labor Day came from, and where it’s going.

Right-click to download
Full Show
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Paul Booth
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
John Schmitt
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Larry Sabato
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.
Jim Hightower
Update Required
To play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.