March 22, 2015

High school seniors are waiting to see what college they will get into, and Harvard Law Professor Lani Guinier says true merit admissions should be based on how well a student will contribute to society. Sociologist Caroline Lee explains the movement toward “public engagement,” a form of activism that brings diverse stakeholders together. And Bill Press talks with Congressman John Larson about the future of Social Security.

  • March 22, 2015 March 22, 2015 Lani Guinier on merit in college admissions, Caroline Lee on the public engagement industry, and Bill Press with Congressman John Larson on Social Security.
  • Lani Guinier Lani Guinier Lani Guinier is a Harvard Law professor with some thoughts on how to introduce true merit into the college admissions process, which she says now privileges only the wealthy.
  • Caroline Lee Caroline Lee Professor Caroline Lee tells us about the concept of “public engagement,” which tries to avoid professional activism in solving both corporate and community problems.
  • John Larson John Larson Bill Press and his guest, Congressman John Larson.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Obama resorts to government by sucker punch.

 

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February 1, 2015

With high school students mulling over which college to attend next fall, prominent legal scholar and educator Lani Guinier says the admissions testing system is all wrong. Progressives are up in arms about new trade agreements on the table. Labor sociologist Chad Broughton tells us what NAFTA did to a once-thriving Midwestern town. And Bill Press talks with Vermont Congressman Peter Welch about Cuba.

  • February 1, 2015 February 1, 2015 Lani Guinier on what’s wrong with the college “testocracy.” Chad Broughton on how NAFTA killed a major manufacturer. And Bill Press interviews Congressman Peter Welch.
  • Lani Guinier Lani Guinier Legal scholar Lani Guinier says the SAT and other college admissions tests are simply a proxy for wealth and that universities, thus, do not train people to contribute to society.
  • Chad Broughton Chad Broughton Labor sociologist Chad Broughton has done a case study on how NAFTA helped shift bargaining power away from unions to corporations.
  • Peter Welch Peter Welch Bill Press and his guest, Congressman Peter Welch of Vermont.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Shoveling America's wealth to the top.


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June 15, 2014

A new college class has graduated, and succeeding ones may have a different racial composition. Law professor Sheryll Cashin says if affirmative action is out, then use a college applicant’s social status to determine admissions. If a conservative stopped listening to Fox News, would she change her views? No, says political scientist John Hibbing, who contends our politics are knitted into our DNA. And Bill Press talks with Congressman John Yarmuth of Kentucky.

  • Jun. 15, 2014 Jun. 15, 2014 Cashin on replacing affirmative action … Hibbing on the genetic basis of politics … and Bill Press with his guest, Kentucky Congressman John Yarmuth.
  • Sheryll Cashin Sheryll Cashin Sheryll Cashin is an African-American law professor at Georgetown University. She makes the case in a new book that it is “place, not race” that should be used in determining college admissions.
  • John Hibbing John Hibbing Professor John Hibbing has studied politics and people’s brains. He says people can sometimes change their views based on evidence, but mostly we voters are responding, in part, to genetics – how we are programmed to see the world.
  • John Yarmuth John Yarmuth Bill Press and his guest, Kentucky Congressman John Yarmuth.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower The NRA ducks a shot of common sense.

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May 11, 2014

In light of the recent Supreme Court decision, a perhaps surprising take on affirmative action from Georgetown law professor Sheryll Cashin. With the V.A. under attack, Aneesh Chopra, the government’s first chief technology officer, tells how the administration actually cleared up a backlog of claims and used information technology to empower veterans. And Bill Press interviews one-time death row inmate Kirk Bloodsworth.

  • May 11, 2014 May 11, 2014 College admissions should be about place, not race, says professor Sheryll Cashin. Government must work with business to create innovative ways of delivering services, says technology expert Aneesh Chopra. And Bill Press interviews an innocent man who was on death row.
  • Sheryll Cashin Sheryll Cashin It’s 50 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 60 years after Brown v. Board of Education, and Georgetown Law professor Sheryll Cashin says it’s time for college admissions to be about place, not race.
  • Aneesh Chopra Aneesh Chopra Innovator Aneesh Chopra, the government’s first chief technology officer, talks about how innovation can better deliver services to the public, and uses the V.A. as an example of how to do it.
  • Kirk Bloodsworth Kirk Bloodsworth Bill Press and his guest, Kirk Bloodsworth, the first death row inmate exonerated by DNA.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower The GOP's minimum wage nuttiness.

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