December 2, 2012

Former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle says no matter who is selected as secretary of state, he doesn’t expect any radical transformation of U.S. foreign policy. Historian and author Michael Lind talks with us about different long-term waves in American history, where we are now and where we are going. And Bill Press interviews Senator Chris Coons of Delaware about the so-called fiscal cliff … and why going over it might not be so bad.

  • Dec. 2, 2012 Dec. 2, 2012 Domestic and foreign policy outlooks in the second term, and a backlash looms against the discredited ideology of Reaganism.
  • Tom Daschle Tom Daschle Long-time leader of Democrats in the Senate, and an expert on health care and foreign policy, Tom Daschle says that in the president’s second term, a lot of hurdles face full implementation of Obamacare but that foreign policy is going to remain on an even keel, no matter who is named secretary of state.
  • Michael Lind Michael Lind Historian Michael Lind thinks the story of America is of long-term waves of technology and social upheaval. Where are we now? He says we are at the end of the Reagan era and there will be a backlash against its discredited policies in the near future.
  • Chris Coons Chris Coons Bill Press interviews Senator Chris Coons of Delaware about the so-called fiscal cliff … and why going over it might not be so bad.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower By axing parks, politicos are stealing from the people.

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Tom Daschle
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Michael Lind
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Chris Coons
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Jim Hightower
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October 21, 2012

Democrats run the economy better but Republicans are better at binding … and binders.

  • Oct. 21, 2012 Oct. 21, 2012 This week, Jere Glover says the data shows Democrats are better for the economy than Republicans. Jonathan Haidt suggests ways for Congress to work better. Bill Press interviews DNC communications director Brad Woodhouse. And Jim Hightower goes down on the farm for a Romney photo op.
  • Jere Glover Jere Glover Did you know that nine out of the last 10 recessions began under Republican administrations? Did you know that the stock market does better under Democrats than Republicans? Eye-opening historical economic data from small-business expert Jere Glover makes it clear which party is better for America.
  • Jonathan Haidt Jonathan Haidt Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt has written a book about why it is that good people are divided so starkly by politics. He says we are a tribal and “groupish” people – and, unfortunately, Republicans are better than Democrats at, in his words, “binding together when under threat.”
  • Brad Woodhouse Brad Woodhouse Bill Press interviews Brad Woodhouse, communications director of the DNC, following the second presidential debate. They discuss Mitt Romney's failed "gotcha" moment on Benghazi, and the offensiveness of politicizing foreign policy.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Jim Hightower goes down on the farm for a Mitt Romney photo op.

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Jere Glover
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Jonathan Haidt
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Brad Woodhouse
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Jim Hightower
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October 14, 2012

How the free market uses government … how Ayn Rand became the gateway drug for right wingers like Paul Ryan … and how Joe Biden exposed Ryan’s extremism.

  • Oct. 14, 2012 Oct. 14, 2012 Steven Conn points out “free-market fundamentalists” are laissez-faire when it suits them, like when it comes to suppressing women’s rights and voting rights. Jennifer Burns says Ayn Rand’s “objectivism” is a gateway drug to life on the right. Then, Bill Press interviews Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown after Biden’s take-down of Ryan. And Jim Hightower takes a look at plutocrats on welfare.
  • Steven Conn Steven Conn Ohio State's Steven Conn’s new book, “To Promote the General Welfare: The Case for Big Government,” takes apart the myth of a free market. He points out that there has never been a truly free market in America because the private sector routinely relies on government – from building railroads to banning women’s reproductive choices.
  • Jennifer Burns Jennifer Burns Republican VP candidate Paul Ryan was an acolyte of right-wing philosopher Ayn Rand. Stanford's Jennifer Burns is a professor at Stanford who is an expert on that philosophy, and she explains its hold on Ryan and other extreme conservatives. According to Burns, Ayn Rand is “a gateway drug to life on the right.”
  • Sherrod Brown Sherrod Brown Bill Press and guest Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown with a morning-after analysis of the vice presidential debate.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Jim Hightower takes a look at plutocrats on welfare.

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Steven Conn
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Sherrod Brown
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August 19, 2012

What killed the last great Senate? Can Democrats retain control of the current not-so-great Senate? And can the Internet replace political parties?

 
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Ira Shapiro

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From the early 1960s through the 1970s, the United States Senate lived up to its historic grandeur, says former Senate staffer Ira Shapiro, the author of a new book called “The Last Great Senate.” What went wrong? Shapiro suggests it was the outside influences of right-wing ideology and big money that turned the world’s greatest deliberative body into a permanent election campaign.
http://irashapiroauthor.com/
 

Ray Glendening

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A new Internet site tries to match up ideological soul mates regardless of political party. The founder of this post-partisan exercise, Ray Glendening, explains how this new platform may bring about a broad and thoughtful conversation about the role of government.
http://www.ruck.us/
 

Jennifer Duffy

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Bill Press interviews political analyst Jennifer Duffy, who says Democrats have an even shot at retaining control of the Senate.
http://www.billpressshow.com/
http://cookpolitical.com/