March 30, 2014

The Paul Ryan budget – the one that believes black men don’t have the culture to work – comes under attack from Democratic strategist Ed Kilgore. With Obamacare once again under fire at the Supreme Court and another sign-up deadline passing, health care analyst Phillip Longman talks about the policy challenges facing the Affordable Care Act. And law professor Stephen Griffin asks — and answers — how Congress can take a bigger role in decisions to go to war.

  • Mar. 30, 2014 Mar. 30, 2014 Ed Kilgore on the Ryan budget … Phil Longman on the challenges facing Obamacare … and Stephen Griffin on the role of Congress in deciding when to go to war.
  • Ed Kilgore Ed Kilgore While Paul Ryan rants about black men being lazy, Democratic analyst Ed Kilgore says the congressman’s budget is a no-compromise holding pattern meant to kill, not just slow down, social programs.
  • Phillip Longman Phillip Longman Phillip Longman studies the U.S. health care system and recommends it be treated as a “common carrier,” like a utility, in which prices are openly set for specific procedures.
  • Stephen Griffin Stephen Griffin When Russia annexed Crimea, it once again raised questions about the role of Congress and the White House in establishing foreign and national defense policy. Law professor Stephen Griffin says Congress should centralize its own decision-making.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower School lunches vs. fat cat dinners.

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November 10, 2013

Democratic Party Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz has a lot to say about Obamacare and tea party extremism, and she advises members of Congress from both parties to just try to be “normal human beings.” A Veterans Week reflection by law professor Mary Dudziak on how America has come to be in a permanent state of war. And Bill Press interviews Joe Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund, about the NSA and Syria.

  • Nov. 10, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 Democratic Party Chair on Obamacare and the Virginia election. A Veterans Week reflection on our state of war, and a peace activist says the U.S. intelligence apparatus is out of control.
  • D. Wasserman Schultz D. Wasserman Schultz Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chair of the Democratic Party and a congresswoman from Florida, says if you don’t like the way your kitchen was remodeled, don’t burn down the house – take the counter out and re-do the cabinet knobs. Her point? The Affordable Care Act needs minor revisions, not arson.
  • Mary Dudziak Mary Dudziak If you just look at all the campaign ribbons and medals handed out by the U.S. military, you can see that this nation has been in pretty much a permanent state of war for a long time. Author Mary Dudziak says Americans are not called upon for any real sacrifice to support wars, such as public engagement about foreign policy.
  • Joe Cirincione Joe Cirincione Bill Press and his guest, Joe Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Congress critters kiss Wall Street butt for cash.

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September 15, 2013

Five years ago, the collapse of Lehman Brothers set off the biggest economic crisis since the Great Depression. Economist James Galbraith analyzes what we have learned since then. At a time when the gap between rich and poor is at a 100-year high, demographer Phillip Longman finds a direct link between an American’s income and health. And Bill Press talks with Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

  • September 15, 2013 September 15, 2013 Five years after Lehman Brothers, economist James Galbraith says the financial sector is dysfunctional. And a demographer says your ZIP code determines your health.
  • James K. Galbraith James K. Galbraith University of Texas economist James K. Galbraith says that five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the economy is starting to slowly come around.
  • Phillip Longman Phillip Longman Health expert Phillip Longman has found that where you live – and how much you make – directly correlates to your health status.
  • Debbie Wasserman Schultz Debbie Wasserman Schultz Bill Press and his guest, Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower Finding the money to fund higher education for all.

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September 8, 2013

An expert in national security defines the two biggest threats to America 12 years after 9/11. The fall semester at colleges around the country has begun, and a former Education Department official has an idea on how to lessen the massive debt burden facing American students. And Bill Press talks with Representative Jim Moran about Syria, and why the Virginia congressman doesn’t attend classified briefings.

  • September 8, 2013 September 8, 2013 Chemical and biological weapons, along with cyberwarfare, are our national security threats. Also, a new semester and still no help for students who are in debt.
  • Michael Greenberger Michael Greenberger Law professor and homeland security expert Michael Greenberger says the two greatest threats to national security 12 years after 9/11 are cyberwarfare and chemical weapons.
  • David Bergeron David Bergeron David Bergeron was a top official in the Education Department. He has a plan for the government to make it a little easier for college graduates to pay off their debt.
  • Jim Moran Jim Moran Bill Press talks with Representative Jim Moran about Syria, and why the Virginia congressman doesn’t attend classified briefings.
  • Jim Hightower Jim Hightower The GOP nincompoops' response to Wendy Davis supporters.

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